300-level

GEOG309
Research for Resilient Environments and Communities
Description
This course will develop your ability to undertake research that supports resilient environments and communities. Drawing on problem-based and service learning approaches, you will design and complete a research project in collaboration with a community partner. The training, practice and critical evaluation of the research will be carried out in groups, and you will communicate your research findings using spoken, numerical and written skills. The course begins with a short fieldtrip, and then progresses through occasional lectures and regular project group meetings, supported by web-based resources. It concludes with a public conference. The emphasis is on students working together to solve real world problems using skills that are transferable to the workplace.
Occurrences
Semester Two 2024
Points
30 points
Prerequisites
30 points of GEOG at 200 level, or ENVR209/GEOG209 and ENVR210
Restrictions
GEOG204, GEOG303

GEOG310
Weather Systems
Description
This course examines the processes responsible for day to day weather variations, and the operational techniques used in their analysis and forecasting. This includes both research and operational approaches to the study of synoptic scale weather systems and their impact. The processes studied include those that have an influence on the generation and decay of weather systems, but also those that affect the weather experienced in a local area, such as Canterbury. The emphasis is on factors important in short term weather changes, including stability/instability and atmospheric motion. These factors are studied in relation to air mass changes, as well as the effects of topography. Links between the general and synoptic scale atmospheric circulation are also studied, along with the effects of longer term change, such as the ENSO cycles.
Occurrences
Semester Two 2024
Points
15 points
Prerequisites
GEOG211 and 15 points from Schedule S to the BSc

GEOG311
Coastal Studies
Description
This course explores the processes that form and change coastal environments in New Zealand, the Pacific and worldwide. Topics examined include a selection of: sea level change today and into the future, waves and currents, the role of sediments in how beaches work to protect land and interact with oceans, plus sessions focussed on the wonders and practical realities of wetlands, tropical reefs, and human interactions with coastal environments. You will gain an understanding of models of the coastal zone, as well as an experience of field methods and laboratory techniques used in coastal investigations. The course was developed based on direct industry feedback and involvement. There is also an optional one-day field-trip, where there is an opportunity to put your learnings into practice and measure waves, currents and beach profiles, and to collect sediment and ecological data for analysis in labs, all using up-to-date professional techniques.
Occurrences
Semester One 2024
Points
15 points
Prerequisites
30 points of 200-level Geography, including GEOG201, or in special cases with approval of the Head of Department.

GEOG312
Snow, Ice and Climate
Description
This course examines the physical processes involved with the formation and evolution of mountain glaciers and seasonal snow, including processes such as surface mass balance, dynamics and hydrology. The course develops knowledge by drawing on key research, and encourages students to critically evaluate published work. The supporting lab programme will enable students to develop a range of transferable skills by working with real data and equipment, for example, ground penetrating radar (GPR), snowpit analysis, and simple glacier models.
Occurrences
Semester Two 2024
Points
15 points
Prerequisites
30 points of 200-level Geography and a further 15 pts at 200-level from any of GEOG, ENVR, GEOL, ANTA, WATR, BIOL, or in special cases with approval of the Head of School.

GEOG321
European Integration From Community to Union
Description
The course is designed to introduce students to the process of European integration that has transformed post-1945 Europe and seen the European Union emerge as a new global power. The course draws on an inter-disciplinary approach and is focused on policy analysis.
Occurrences
Semester One 2024
Points
30 points
Prerequisites
One of: (a) 15 points with a B average in any Arts subject; or (b) any 15 points in GEOG at 200 level; or (c) 15 points of EURO at 200-level with a B Pass: or (d) 30 points of EURO at 200-level; or (e) any 45 points from the Arts Schedule at 200-level.
Restrictions
EURO210, EURO310, EURA210, EURA310

GEOG323
Geospatial Analysis in the Social and Environmental Sciences
Description
This course provides an introduction to spatial analysis, an important tool for exploring, analysing, modelling and visualising geospatial data. Students will acquire the knowledge and skills necessary to investigate and understand spatial patterns resulting from social and physical processes operating on the surface of Earth, such as epidemics, crime and pollution. A variety of software packages will be introduced and used to explore different aspects of spatial analysis. A number of issues inherent to dealing with spatial data, such as the ecological fallacy and modifiable areal unit problem (MAUP), will also be highlighted.
Occurrences
Semester One 2024
Points
15 points
Prerequisites
30 points of 200-level Geography, including GEOG205, or in special cases with approval of the Head of Department.

GEOG324
Web GIS and Geoinformatics
Description
This course builds on GEOG205 Introduction to GIS, delving deeper into the nuts and bolts of how GIS work and advancing students' knowledge and skills in geographic data management, geographic information systems design, geographic information visualisation, and human computer interaction from a geoinformatics perspective. GEOG324 is a technical, largely lab- and project-based course, where students will use a mix of proprietary and open source GIS software to gain advanced skills in GIS, focusing on Web GIS applications. Students will learn how databases are used to store geographic information, and gain practice in the creation of dynamic web maps and Internet-based spatial analysis. There is also a research component to the course in order to ensure students are aware of the research landscape in geographic information science (GIScience) and are able to critically analyse work undertaken in GIScience.
Occurrences
Semester Two 2024
Points
15 points
Prerequisites
30 points of 200-level Geography, including GEOG205, or in special cases with approval of the Head of Department. Recommended preparation: COSC121, or equivalent introductory programming course.

GEOG325
Health, Wellbeing and Environment
Description
Human health and wellbeing are profoundly shaped by the environments in which we live. This course examines the influence of the physical, built and social aspects of the environment on health and wellbeing. In addition to gaining increased understanding of health-environment interactions, students will develop skills in tracking environmental exposures and in presenting research findings in both written and oral formats.
Occurrences
Semester One 2024
Points
15 points
Prerequisites
30 points of Geography at 200 level; or 30 points from Science, Arts or Health Sciences.
Restrictions
GEOG322

GEOG351
Rethinking Development
Description
This course explores the ways in which people across the globe are building community economies based on ethical concerns for more sustainable and equitable futures. It will provide students with a theoretical basis for rethinking economies and some practical skills in organising for community¬Ā-based development interventions.
Occurrences
Semester Two 2024
Points
15 points
Prerequisites
Any 30 points of 200 level Geography, or approval of the Head of Department.
Restrictions
GEOG212

Not Offered Courses in 2024

300-level

GEOG340
Field Based Geomorphic Applications
Description
This course examines practical applications of geomorphology and environmental management, providing a basic understanding of regolith and soil genesis; relationships between soil erosion, fluvial processes and sedimentation; and the principles of landscape management and restoration. Field studies and practical examples include soil erosion and hydrology of forested and agricultural catchments, urban stream and wetland reconstruction, and the management of steepland environments.
Occurrences
Not offered 2024, offered in 2014
For further information see GEOG340 course details
Points
15 points

GEOG345
Special Topic
Occurrences
Not offered 2024, offered in 2013 , 2014 , 2018 , 2019 , 2021
For further information see GEOG345 course details
Points
15 points